Magic Basketball: An Orlando Magic blog - Part 142

Apr 20

Wednesday’s Magic Word

  • Josh Robbins of the Orlando Sentinel: “If the Orlando Magic struggled to shoot the ball against the Atlanta Hawks in just one game, you could call it an aberration. If it happened twice, you could label that a mere coincidence. But the Magic’s continued offensive woes against the Hawks now have to be considered a pattern — a pattern that might force Orlando to change its identity on that end of the court just to escape the first round of these playoffs. [...] In three games against the Hawks since March 30 — one in the regular season and two in these playoffs — the Magic have made only 40.0 percent of their shots from the field and just 26.5 percent of their 3-point tries. Those woeful shooting numbers place even greater pressure on the Magic to avoid turnovers, rebound well and play strong defense. During the regular season, Orlando led the league in 3-pointers made per game (9.4) and 3-pointers attempted per game (25.6). Now, all of a sudden, those shots from beyond the arc just aren’t falling.”
  • Jason Richardson stepped up when the Orlando Magic needed him to.
  • Check out two key hustle plays that ignited the Magic’s win against the Atlanta Hawks.
  • Tony Allen questions Dwight Howard‘s Defensive Player of the Year coronation.
  • John Denton of OrlandoMagic.com: “If one thing has become apparent to Howard and the Magic after two games of this first-round playoff series, it’s that nothing at all is going to be easy. That’s so unlike last spring, of course, when the Magic ransacked the Hawks in a four-game sweep by a historic 25 points a game on average. But with this series tied at 1-all heading into Friday’s Game 3 in Atlanta, it’s apparent that the Magic and Hawks will likely continue to make life tough for one another. [...] Nothing at all was easy about the Magic’s Game 2 victory that knotted the series. Orlando fell behind by 10 midway through the second quarter, shot the ball poorly all night and nearly squandered a 12-point lead late in the fourth quarter. Leading 78-76, point guard Jameer Nelson dived to save a ball from going out of bounds and fed it to Hedo Turkoglu, who eventually converted a layup to put the Magic up four. And seconds later, Jason Richardson took a feed from Turkoglu and capped another poor shooting night with a 3-point dagger that secured the victory for the Magic.”
  • The Magic’s desire to play with energy and effort on defense returned in Game 2.
  • Matt Moore of CBSSports.com: “The Magic’s offense? Still missing. The Hawks’ matchup advantages? Still there (Josh Smith 17 points, Jamal Crawford 25 points). But the Magic reasserted some of their own with Jameer Nelson edging Kirk Hinrich (who couldn’t hit water if he fell out of a submarine in the middle of a deep-sea trench Tuesday night). But systemically the Magic got what they needed. The Hawks got their win in Orlando and now head back to Atlanta. System vs. Personnel. The battle continues. We’ve told you again and again. This one is going to be long and tough. And even in a loss, you have to wonder if the momentum doesn’t lie with Atlanta.”
  • Dwight Howard had one of the lines of the night according to Shannon Booher of SLAM ONLINE: “That’s EVERY minute in case you didn’t know. Another dominating performance from the guy who received the L.O.N. M.V.P. vote. They almost blew this one, though, despite a seemingly uninspired (except for J-Creezy) effort from the Hawks. Seriously — Josh Smith and Joe Johnson — the Playoffs started a few days ago. Y’all are invited to participate. Special note to Josh — you are allowed to drive to the basket and utilize your insane physical gifts.”
  • Does Orlando remind you of the Ohio State program in college basketball?
  • Tracy Weissenberg of SLAM ONLINE matter-of-factly responds to Howard playing all 48 minutes against the Hawks: “Game 3 is Friday in Atlanta and Howard is lucky he has two days to rest.”
  • John Hollinger of ESPN Insider: “I’ve ripped coaches for extreme conservatism with foul trouble before, but what Larry Drew did Tuesday night in Orlando takes the cake. It may very well cost the Hawks the series. For those who didn’t see, Horford — Atlanta’s best player — picked up two fouls in the first 2:11 of the game, and Drew’s response was to sit him out for the ENTIRE FIRST HALF. This is straight out of the Larry Brown-Mike Woodson playbook, and Drew comes from that coaching tree, but I can’t emphasize enough what an irrational and counterproductive strategy this is. [...] There is no way to sugarcoat it: This is the most indefensible coaching decision I’ve seen this season. Horford played the entire second half and finished the game with — you guessed it — two fouls. This didn’t come as a surprise to anyone who watched the Hawks this season. Horford has one of the lowest foul rates in the league at his position — just 2.85 fouls per 40 minutes — so even if he had stayed in the game with the two fouls he was at virtually no risk of fouling out.”
  • Zach Lowe of The Point Forward is also wondering why head coach Larry Drew sat Horford.
  • In case you haven’t heard, Howard has an injured right shoulder.
  • Kevin Pelton of Basketball Prospectus: “The difference in the first two games of this series was less about adjustments and more about regression to the mean. While the Orlando Magic had more of a balanced offensive output than in Game One, when Dwight Howard and Jameer Nelson got virtually no help from their teammates, the end result was about the same. In fact, the Magic scored fewer points per possession. However, the Atlanta Hawks were unable to replicate their hot Game One shooting, and the result was an Orlando victory that felt more resounding most of the second half.”
  • Kelly Dwyer of Ball Don’t Lie: “Dwight Howard was everywhere, and though Orlando’s perimeter defense improved somewhat, I’m handing most of the acclaim at Howard’s feet as he effectively closed off the mid-range that worked so well for the Hawks in Game 1. Jamal Crawford and Al Horford had their moments, but they weren’t anywhere near as effective from just inside the 3-point line as we saw on Saturday, and Howard’s ability to show and then get back on the glass is the reason why.”
  • Head coach Stan Van Gundy thinks there’s a lack of hype surrounding Howard.

Apr 20

Recapping Games 1 and 2 for the Orlando Magic with Synergy

Photo by J. Meric/Getty Images

Before the playoffs started, I previewed Orlando’s first round matchup using data from Synergy Sports Technology. Let’s take a look at the results from the playoff games in Orlando.

Game 1

PPP = Points Per Possession

Orlando offense
As a team, Orlando posted up 25 times, and 24 of the post up chances came from Dwight. The only non-Dwight post up was when Brandon Bass went against Al Horford in the 1st quarter. The Magic averaged 1.24 PPP, and continued their trend of posting up more versus Atlanta than they did against other opponents this year (16.3%).

Orlando was dominant when they isolated on offense. In the regular season, they averaged 0.83 PPP. In Game 1, they increased their mark by 0.6 PPP. Hedo Turkoglu was 2-2 in isolation. He hit a three-pointer over Etan Thomas to give Orlando a 19-17 lead in the first quarter and hit an off balance jumper in the final minutes of the game

Dwight Howard was the third best player in the NBA when he cut to the rim in the regular season. In the opener versus Atlanta he finished his first cut opportunity with a dunk, and on the second chance he drew a foul and shot a pair of free throws.

In the first 82 games, Orlando was the NBA’s best team at scoring with their roll men. In the first game of the playoffs, their roll men never used a possession. However, the ball handler in the pick-and-roll used nearly 1 out of 5 possessions.

Orlando’s spot up game was miserable on Saturday, and their PPP was less than half of their regular season average. The Magic attempted 15 spot-up attempts, and 11 were three-pointers. Gilbert Arenas and Jameer Nelson each made one spot-up three, while Jason Richardson and Hedo Turkoglu were 0-5 combined.

Read the rest of this entry »

Apr 20

Second Look: Orlando Magic 88, Atlanta Hawks 82

Photo by J. Meric/Getty Images

  • Josh Robbins of the Orlando Sentinel: “The Orlando Magic may have saved their season Tuesday night. And to do it, they relied on a tried-and-true formula: an improved defense, a critical hustle play by Jameer Nelson and a 48-minute dose of Dwight Howard. Riding another Herculean performance by their all-star center, the Magic outlasted the Atlanta Hawks 88-82 in an intense, emotional Game 2 to even their first-round series at one game apiece. Those teammates followed his lead. [...] Nelson, his co-captain, played almost 38 minutes even though he missed part of the Magic’s morning shootaround due to a migraine headache. The diminutive point guard probably turned in the most important play of the game — and most important play of the Magic’s season — late in the fourth quarter. The Hawks had gone on a 12-2 run to cut the Magic’s lead to 78-76 with 2:14 remaining in regulation. On the ensuing possession, Atlanta’s Zaza Pachulia knocked the ball out of Howard’s hands and toward the sideline. Nelson sprinted toward the ball, dived onto the parquet floor and collected it before Kirk Hinrich could. Nelson passed it to Howard, who sent it to Ryan Anderson, who tossed it to Hedo Turkoglu. Turkoglu drove to the basket, banked it off the glass and the ball rolled around the rim gingerly before it fell through the hoop.”
  • Brian Schmitz of the Orlando Sentinel: “All I know is that Stan Van Gundy has had to robb Peter to pay Paul as he tries to piece together game plans with baling wire and duct tape. His slim pick’ns aren’t just slim; they’re microscopic. I don’t want to say that Van Gundy was searching for help, but I swear he had dogs and a flashlight at his disposal. You couldn’t blame him if he tried to sign Nick Anderson out of the stands, and Nick’s 43. What’s the whole key for the Magic the rest of the way? Rest. They need to thank the NBA schedule-makers who place two, sometimes three, days between games. Game 2 is Friday night in Atlanta. The Magic are taking today off and will hardly break a sweat on Thursday. Dwight Howard and Jameer Nelson could use a week in The Bahamas and intravenous fluids. Because with no bench, Van Gundy needs his starters to put their feet up as much as possible. After two games, Hawks are outscoring the Magic’s reserves, 64-26. Jamal Crawford has 48 himself.”
  • Mike Bianchi of the Orlando Sentinel: “Do you know how lucky you are, Magic fans? It’s rare when you actually get to watch a high school kid grow into a legend right before their eyes. And, of course, this is why Orlando fans anguish: Because they know how important these playoffs are to Dwight’s future in Orlando. It certainly didn’t help ease their worried minds a few days ago when one ESPN “insider” speculated that Howard will be traded by the Magic this summer. Forget the speculation about Dwight’s future and savor the coronation of Dwight’s greatness. Van Gundy said something very wise a couple of months ago when he was talking about all the hullabaloo surrounding Carmelo Anthony’s departure from Denver and the resulting speculation about whether Dwight would stay in Orlando. Van Gundy’s message – and I’m paraphrasing – was essentially this: Why do American sports fans and media spend so much time and effort worrying about what might happen down the road rather than enjoying what’s right in front of them now? And what is right in front of Magic fans at this juncture in time is a once-in-a-lifetime player. Sometimes I wonder if Howard is appreciated enough, not only locally but nationally. Do we realize what we are watching? Do we understand that he is not only the greatest Magic player of all-time, but one of the greatest NBA players of all-time? We have another Russell and Chamberlain in our midst.”
  • John Denton of OrlandoMagic.com: “In a game that was never easy – certainly not when Orlando trailed by 10 points in the second quarter nor when Atlanta got within two points with 2 minutes to play – the Magic were finally able to exhale Tuesday night with a 1-1 split in this best-of-seven playoff series. Orlando needed another monstrous, 48-minute game from Dwight Howard, a clutch layup from Hedo Turkoglu and a dagger of a 3-pointer from Jason Richardson to hold off Atlanta 88-82 Tuesday at the Amway Center to pull even in this remarkably even first-round playoff series. J.J. Redick dived on the floor early in the game to corral a loose ball and Jameer Nelson did the same late in the fourth quarter – both dives resulting in key Magic baskets and were emblematic of the effort that the Magic poured into what many considered a must-win.”
  • Evan Dunlap of Orlando Pinstriped Post: “Indeed, the way Drew doled out his frontcourt minutes will come into question here. Leaving two end-of-the-bench types alone to fend with the league’s best center is one thing, but benching one’s own best player for almost the entire first half is another. Al Horford picked up his second personal foul just 2:10 into the game, which prompted Drew to pull Horford for the rest of the half. The trickle-down effect it had on Atlanta’s rotation left it without a reliable offensive big man. On a night when Johnson (6-of-15, 14 points), Marvin Williams (1-of-6, 4 points) and Kirk Hinrich (4-of-12, 9 points) struggled to produce from the wings, Atlanta needed another scorer. The fact that the Hawks whittled a 14-point Magic lead to 4 with less than two minutes to play only further underscores the seriousness of Drew’s gaffe. I believe Horford represents an improvement over Powell and Armstrong to such a degree that he would have been worth at least 6 points, the Magic’s final victory margin, had he played over those two for at least another 8 first-half minutes. He at least commands defensive attention; Howard rightly ignored Armstrong and Powell whenever the Hawks had possession. Indeed, Drew helped turn Howard, the league’s top defender, loose defensively as a helper.”
  • Michael Cunningham of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution: “Dwight Howard had another dominant performance, and this time more of his teammates chipped in. In the end, the Hawks couldn’t hold down Orlando’s shooters as Howard had his way with their centers. The Magic pulled away late for an 88-82 victory in Game 2 of the first-round Eastern Conference playoffs series. Orlando’s Jason Richardson, Hedo Turkoglu and Ryan Anderson all made timely 3-pointers in the second half. Those plays, plus Howard’s 33 points, were enough for the Magic to tie the series 1-1 as it moves to Philips Arena for Game 3 on Friday.”
  • Jeff Schultz of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution: “They won game one and threw a scare into Orlando in game two. Forget the odds. Forget the mood swings of the regular season. Forget the part of you that says, ‘I don’t like this team. I don’t trust this team. They’re going nowhere.’ The Hawks didn’t guarantee themselves a playoff series upset with their performances in  Orlando. But they certainly sent a message in game two that game one wasn’t a fluke. After winning the series opener Saturday, they led the heavily favored and desperate Magic by as much as 10 points in the second quarter, fizzled, fell behind by 14 in the fourth, looked dead and then showed the fight and resiliency that too often was missing this season to pull to within two at 78-76 with two minutes left. In the end, they ran out of gasps and spasms, losing 88-82 Tuesday night. But Orlando walked off their home court with their hearts nearly jumping out of their chest — and this time Jameer Nelson didn’t make a stop to make a crack about catching Chicago in the second round.”
  • Bret LaGree of Hoopinion: “As impressive and enjoyable as the Game 1 victory was, two concerns lingered: the probably unsustainable percentage of jump shots the Hawks made (unofficially, I have the Hawks 7-23 from 16-23 feet and, thus, 40.7 eFG% outside of 16 feet once three-pointers are accounted for) and Larry Drew’s tactical personnel decisions. In Game 2, the Hawks shot much worse and had a chance to win despite Larry Drew. It was a terribly wasted opportunity but, if Drew can either commit to playing his best players until they are disqualified or not play his worst players until absolutely necessary, the Hawks, in possession of home court advantage, can still conceivably win this series. Which is rather amazing considering they were outscored over the course of the 82 game season and their head coach either didn’t try his hardest or proved himself obscenely incompetent in one half of their playoff games.”

Apr 20

Recap: Orlando Magic 88, Atlanta Hawks 82

Photo by J. Meric/Getty Images

BOX SCORE

Avenging their home loss in Game 1 on Saturday, the Orlando Magic were able to defeat the Atlanta Hawks by the score of 88-82 to tie the series at 1-1. Defense and the timely contributions of Hedo Turkoglu and Jason Richardson on offense in the fourth quarter, as well as another all-around monster performance from Dwight Howard, were the keys to victory for the Magic. Playing the entire game, Howard finished with 33 points (9-of-12 shooting from the field, 15-of-19 from the free-throw line), 19 rebounds, and two steals. Howard was transcendent on both ends of the floor and there was little the Hawks could do to stop him. Jameer Nelson, battling a migraine throughout the game, contributed with 13 points, eight rebounds, and two steals. Turkoglu and Richardson combined for 18 points on 7-of-28 shooting, but clutch shots from both players down the stretch were able to dispel Atlanta’s comeback attempt. All it took for the role players for Orlando to provide support to Howard for them to come away with the victory.

Read the rest of this entry »

Apr 19

Tuesday’s Magic Word

  • Mike Bianchi of the Orlando Sentinel: “Dwight Howard is a better defensive center than Bill Russell. That’s right, BILL RUSSELL. And this isn’t me talking because, quite frankly, Bill Russell was before my time although I do remember when I was kid listening to my stepdad and his buddies talking about how Kareem Abdul-Jabbar was a great center, but, by gosh, he was no Bill Russell. In fact, I almost spewed Bud Light out of my nose the other night after the Magic-Nuggets game when Magic color analyst Matt Guokas was talking to play-by-play man David Steele during their post-game wrap-up. That’s when Guokas dropped the bombshell and actually said Howard is a better defensive center than Russell and, therefore, the greatest defensive big man in the history of the game. Is this basketball blasphemy by a homer broadcaster or is it intrepid analysis by an astute observer of the game? If it was anybody else except Guokas, I might call him a hopeless homer, but that’s just not Guokas’ style. He is not a bombastic broadcaster who is disposed to hyperbole. He is a thoughtful, knowledgeable historian of the game who gives honest opinions during Magic telecasts. Not only that, but he played against Russell, played with and against Wilt Chamberlain and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and is old enough to remember when George Mikan played for the old Minneapolis Lakers.”
  • Jason Richardson talks about defending Joe Johnson.
  • Players’ habits don’t change according to head coach Stan Van Gundy.
  • Jameer Nelson talks about the improvements needed for the Orlando Magic.
  • The Atlanta Hawks have a chance to take a commanding 2-0 lead against the Magic.
  • Evan Dunlap of Orlando Pinstriped Post: “To my recollection, a typical Magic post-up for Howard goes a bit like this: a wing player, usually on the left side of the floor, throws an entry pass to Howard, who’s stationed on the left block. The post-entry passer then cuts through the paint to the weak side, finds a spot beyond the arc, and stands still. The three other players stand in place. This alignment puts no pressure on the defense, which has nothing substantial to react to, no tough decisions to make. It seems like it’d be wise for Orlando to at least send a cutter or to the basket, or run a pin-down on the weak side for a shooter, while Howard operates in the post. Get the would-be help defenders moving, force them to make a choice, find the hole, exploit it. Longtime readers of this site know I tend to advocate more motion in Orlando’s offense, either by involving Howard in more pick-and-rolls or by running some off-ball action to free a wing player as outlined above, whenever the team consistently stagnates. As much as I hate to use that talking point so much, I still believe it to be true. I don’t know that Orlando will have much postseason success if it continues to run its offense this way.”
  • Matt Moore of CBSSports.com notes an adjustment Orlando needs to make in Game 2 later tonight: “According to Synergy Sports , you know how many pick and roll plays the Magic ran? 31. You know how many wound up in the hands of the roll man? None. Zip, zero, zilch. That makes Dwight Howard’s night more impressive, but it also means a few things. One, if you go back and watch, the Hawks are closing two to three defenders on Howard or whoever the roll man is. Two, that adjustment means that the Magic, had they opted to, would have had an open shooter off the second pass on the pick, drive and kick. But instead, they just launched. Nelson comes off the screen, he kicks out, catch and shoot. Except that they were rushing all those shots. They had the opportunity to spin the ball when the Hawks started to try and recover, but instead just let it fly. The result? Brick city. The Magic are at their best not when they’re just launching threes, but when they’re actually creating stupendously open shots from their ball rotation. That’s how they beat the Celtics and Cavaliers in 2009, and going away from that strategy in 2010 hurt them, as it’s hurting them now. They have experienced, competent passers and shooters on the perimeter. The Magic need to slow down their decision making, not their pace, and work to create the best shot possible. Do that and their perimeter game will finally start to click.”
  • Nate Drexler makes an appearance in ESPN.com’s 5-on-5 writer roundup.
  • Kelly Dwyer of Ball Don’t Lie chimes in on Dwight Howard winning the Defensive Player of the Year award for the third consecutive time in his career.
  • Farewell to former Magic player Jason Williams.

Apr 19

Preview: Atlanta Hawks at Orlando Magic, Game 2

7:30 EDT | NBA TV
44-38 @ 52-30
Pythagorean Record: 39-43 Pythagorean Record: 56-26
Pace: 89.3 (27th) Pace: 91.4 (17th)
Offensive Rating: 106.1 (20th) Offensive Rating: 107.7 (14th)
Defensive Rating: 107.0 (13th) Defensive Rating: 101.8 (3rd)
Amway Center | Hawks lead series 1-0

Apr 19

Behold, the three-time Defensive Player of the Year

Photo taken by Fernando Medina

Via the Orlando Magic:

Orlando Magic center Dwight Howard becomes the first player to win three consecutive Kia NBA Defensive Player of the Year awards in NBA history, only Dikembe Mutombo and Ben Wallace, with four each, have won the award more times. Howard received the award on Monday, April 18 in a press conference at Amway Center.

Apr 19

Sneak Preview: Atlanta Hawks at Orlando Magic, Game 2

AP Photo/John Raoux

  • George Diaz of the Orlando Sentinel: “So Dwight Howard is the NBA Defensive Player of the Year. Third year in a row for the big man. Congrats. He became the first player in league history to receive the honor three consecutive years. Howard finished second in the league in rebounds per game (14.1) and fourth in blocked shots per game (2.38), often cleaning up the mess of his teammates in the paint who are inferior defenders. But it is time for an upgrade. Will Howard be named the NBA’s Most Valuable Player when the award is announced shortly? Everybody in the know has the answer. The fix is in, if you will, because everyone is smitten with Derrick Rose of the Chicago Bulls. The team improved 21 games in victories thanks in large measure to Rose’s leadership. And his ability to ‘break ankles’ driving to the paint is scary. But you could also argue that the [Orlando] Magic could be a lottery team without Dwight, unless you truly think Malik Allen has been wasting his time on the bench and now it’s his turn to shine. Howard will likely be content to be the runnerup, much like the guy in the prom who stands there when the King kisses the Queen. It shouldn’t be that way.”
  • Josh Robbins of the Orlando Sentinel: “Our stat of the day comes courtesy of the NBA, and if it doesn’t give the Orlando Magic and their fans a sense of urgency, nothing will. Only 14 teams in league history have won a best-of-seven playoff series after falling behind two games to zero. Translation: The Magic would face a daunting uphill climb if they drop Game 2 of their first-round series against the Atlanta Hawks tonight at Amway Center. [...]  The perimeter defenders must find a way to slow down Atlanta guards Kirk Hinrich, Joe Johnson and Jamal Crawford. Ryan Anderson, Brandon Bass, Jason Richardson and Hedo Turkoglu need to score some points. And everybody, particularly Dwight Howard, needs to take better care of the basketball. It’s a long to-do list.”
  • John Denton of OrlandoMagic.com: “Usually immaculately dressed after games in clothes that are both tailored and fashionable, Orlando Magic superstar center Dwight Howard trudged to his postgame interview late Saturday night in a wrinkled shooting shirt. Howard was so mad and so filled with frustration following the Magic’s 103-93 Game 1 loss to the Atlanta Hawks that he didn’t even want to get dressed following the game. How, he wondered, could he have the game of his life with 46 points and 19 rebounds and his Magic still lose to the Hawks? How could an Atlanta team that looked mostly lifeless down the stretch go out in the playoffs and shoot 58 percent through three periods and 51 percent for the game? And how was Howard going to handle having to hear trash talk from Hawks’ forwards Josh Smith and Josh Powell, two childhood friends from his days growing up in Atlanta?”
  • Michael Cunningham of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution: “The Magic were so dominant over the Hawks in the last year’s Eastern Conference semifinals they hardly needed to make any major adjustments from game to game. After Atlanta’s convincing 103-93 victory in Game 1 on Saturday night, Orlando is the one scrambling to figure out a sound plan to guard the Hawks. The difficulty for the Magic is that, for the most part, they did execute their defensive game plan in Game 1. The Hawks foiled it anyway. [...] The Magic prefer opponents to attempt long jump shots because they are the least efficient. It turns out the Hawks are good at making them, though. That’s just one of the strategic problems facing the Magic as they prepare for Game 2 of the best-of-seven series on Tuesday night. It’s a far cry from last spring, when the Magic won Game 1 114-71 and swept four games by an NBA-record of 101 points.”
  • Jeff Schultz of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution: “This first-round match-up between the Hawks and Orlando has been intriguing for two reasons: 1) Atlanta, a significant underdog, won the opener in Orlando; 2) Howard, despite scoring 46 points in the game, seemed frustrated by the Hawks’ aggressive and physical defense inside, led by Jason ‘Sluggo’ Collins. Things boiled over to the point of Howard head-butting Collins while he had his back to him, throwing out his arms as if Collins had pulled him back to cause the contact. But there’s no evidence a pull ever took place, and Collins, briefly knocked dizzy, mused after the game, ‘I’m ready for elbows and arms but I’m not ready for a head butt.’ Collins laughed Monday when told Howard blamed him for the contact.”

Apr 18

Monday’s Magic Word

  • Josh Robbins of the Orlando Sentinel: “Dwight Howard now has accomplished something Alonzo Mourning, Dikembe Mutombo and Hakeem Olajuwon never did. The Orlando Magic center won the 2010-11 NBA Defensive Player of the Year Award on Monday and became the first player in league history to receive the honor three years in a row. ‘It’s a great accomplishment,’ Howard said. ‘It’s a blessing. It’s an honor. And I just thank God for this opportunity and just for blessing me with the ability to be able to get stops on the defensive end, block shots, rebound, just do a lot of things and also have this award. Three times in a row is history. I never really thought about it like that until I saw the awards, but I just want to keep it going.’ Howard won this year’s award in a landslide. He earned 114 first-place votes out of 120 ballots cast. Boston Celtics power forward Kevin Garnett finished second. Dallas Mavericks center Tyson Chandler placed third.”
  • Zach McCann of the Orlando Sentinel: “Atlanta Hawks guard Joe Johnson was a non-factor in last year’s playoff series against the Orlando Magic, shooting 29.8 percent and scoring just 12.8 points per game in the four-game sweep. And now, one year later, he’s the player who hurt the Magic the most in Game 1 by scoring 25 points on 56.3 percent shooting. It’s not like Johnson has evolved as a player in 12 months – his scoring is actually lower this year. And the Hawks are comprised of mostly the same players, so it’s not like he’s getting better looks or less attention from Orlando. So, what’s the difference? The Magic’s primary defender on Johnson last year was Vince Carter, and this year it’s Jason Richardson. Is Carter’s defense that much better than Richardson’s?”
  • Do the Orlando Magic have anything to worry about after losing Game 1?
  • Dwight Howard achieved a never-before-done feat.
  • Mike Prada of SBNation: “Apparently, it is possible for an NBA team to allow a player to score 46 points and be universally praised for it. Dwight Howard ran all over the Atlanta Hawks’ single-coverage, but because nobody else on his team decided to do much of anything, the Hawks came away with a Game 1 victory on the road. Howard and Jameer Nelson scored 73 points; everyone else on the Magic scored 20. Howard and Nelson shot 26-41; everyone else shot 8-34. It was a brilliant strategy by the Hawks to make sure that their horrible teammates had horrible games. Let’s praise them for it! Snark aside, the bottom line is this. Playing Howard straight-up and taking away the three-point shooters is a strategy. Allowing Howard to score 46 points and hope his teammates shoot 8-34 is not. Luckily, the Hawks shot nearly 50 percent from 16-23 feet and made it work. That doesn’t mean it’s a sustainable long-term strategy, but whenever writers are given the chance to question Howard’s worth as a player for being just the 11th player since 1985 to score 45 or more points in a playoff game and lose, they’ll take it.”
  • Zach Lowe of The Point Forward: “There’s a reason the Magic ranked third in points allowed per possession and in the top five (per Synergy Sports) in defending pick-and-rolls where the ball-handler finishes the play (first); pick-and-rolls where the roll man finishes (fifth); spot-up chances (fifth) and scoring chances that followed offensive rebounds (first). They managed to do this all without a rotation player any group of league executives would comfortably describe as an above average defender at his position. There’s a reason no team allowed fewer shot attempts at the rim this season. “
  • There are skeptics that wonder if the Atlanta Hawks will be able to beat the Magic.
  • A great illustration as to the reason Howard won the Defensive Player of the Year award.
  • One voter did not have Howard on his ballot for Defensive Player of the Year.
  • Steve Aschburner of NBA.com: “The figure on the DPOY trophy, after all, surely is a perimeter guy, squatting down the way Naismith or Wooden would have taught, arms flared out in a defensive stance. Howard, of course, rarely assumes that position; he patrols inside the paint for the Magic, either lurking and banging behind his man, flashing over to give help or licking his chops at the shorties funneled his way by Magic teammates. That’s how he looked at the news conference, looming large, having his guys’ backs.”
  • Royce Young of CBSSports.com provides his take on Howard’s impact on defense.
  • The Hawks’ win in Game 1 was crazy, but not as crazy as the other first round games.
  • M. Haubs of The Painted Area reveals his awards ballot.
  • Shannon Booher of SLAM ONLINE marvels at Howard’s Game 1 performance: “Gooooood lawd! As good as he was, that is how bad his teammates (not named Jameer Nelson) were, on offense. And these aren’t playoff newbies. We are talking Hedo [Turkoglu]. Jason Richardson. Gilbert Arenas. The list goes on. Those guys won’t be as bad next game, but Howard probably won’t be as good, either. The Hawks have at least established that they are not going out like they did last year. No brooms here.”
  • Kurt Helin of ProBasketballTalk: “Magic fans don’t want to draw the line connecting the dots. You can’t blame them. But the loss to Atlanta seemed to move those dots toward being in a straight line. And if things don’t change Dwight Howard could connect them himself and devastate the Orlando franchise. The starting point is here: every time Dwight Howard rejects talking in any detail about his future free agent plans — he can opt out in the summer of 2012, but rightfully says that is too far away to think about — he falls back on two themes. One, he really likes Orlando and its fans. Secondly, that he wants to win championships. You can be sure that part two outweighs part one. He has said as much.”

Apr 18

Dwight Howard wins 2010-11 KIA NBA Defensive Player of the Year Award

Photo by J. Meric/Getty Images

Via the Orlando Magic:

Dwight Howard of the Orlando Magic is the recipient of the 2010-11 Kia NBA Defensive Player of the Year Award, the NBA announced today. Howard becomes the first player to earn the honor three straight seasons; only Dikembe Mutombo and Ben Wallace, with four each, have won the award more times.

The 6-11 center led the league with 66 double-doubles, including six 20-point/20-rebound efforts, while ranking second in rebounds (14.1 rpg) and fourth in blocks (2.38 bpg). With Howard manning the middle, the Magic allowed 93.5 ppg, ranking fourth in that category. The seventh-year veteran reached several historical milestones this season, including:

  • On March 1 vs. New York, Howard, at 25 years and 83 days old, became the youngest player in NBA history to amass 7,000 career rebounds, passing Wilt Chamberlain, who was 26 years and 128 days old when he passed the 7,000-rebound plateau.
  • He recorded at least 1,000 rebounds and 100 blocked shots for the sixth straight year; since blocked shots were officially tracked in 1973-74, only Moses Malone has done it more (seven seasons).
  • He became one of only five players in NBA history since blocked shots became an official statistic in 1973-74 to record at least 6,000 rebounds and 1,000 blocked shots in his first 500 games.

As part of its support of the Defensive Player of the Year Award, Kia Motors America will donate a new Kia Sorento CUV to BETA Center, a private, nonprofit organization with 32 years of experience helping families in the greater Orlando area. Kia Motors will present a brand new Sorento to the charity of choice of each of four 2010-11 season-end award winners as part of the “The Kia NBA Performance Awards.” Following this season, Kia Motors will have donated a total of 16 new vehicles to charitable organizations since its support of the NBA’s prestigious year-end honors began with the 2007-2008 season.

Howard received 585 points, including 114 first-place votes, from a panel of 120 sportswriters and broadcasters throughout the United States and Canada. Boston’s Kevin Garnett finished second with 77 points and Dallas’ Tyson Chandler finished third with 70 points. Players were awarded five points for each first-place vote, three points for each second-place vote and one point for each third-place vote received.

Page 142 of 256« First...102030...140141142143144...150160170...Last »